This project was born from a feeling of homesickness. Living in the remote West Kimberley and returning home to New Zealand several times a year means I move between two very different worlds, and neither really understands the other. I grew up in a valley in New Zealand where the sky was long and narrow and although I have travelled extensively, it was not until living in the flat savannah of Derby that the absence of hills and mountains became noticeable and overwhelming. The Kimberley is saturated in sunlight for most of the year. At times the sun and heat feel unrelenting and I long for winter. I began to have a recurring daydream of standing under mountains in the deep south of New Zealand. It was a subconscious retreat to a place I know and belong.  I became interested in ochre through my work at Mowanjum Aboriginal Art & Culture Centre. We have colour charts of Kimberley ochre on the studio walls – it’s a palette that is really different from my homeland. I received permission to use ochre in my artwork from Ngarinyin elder Pansy Nulgit.   
 Termite mounds are common in the flat savannah around my home in the Kimberley
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 Termite mound reflecting the mounds found all over the Kimberley landscape. They are iconic and unique features of the Kimberley. Here the drawing has been made using over 2500 meters of thread and Kimberley ochre.
 Termite mounds drawn with 2500 meters of thread and Kimberley ochre reflect the mounds found all over the Kimberley landscape. They are iconic and unique features of the Kimberley.
 Termite mounds and grass reflecting the Kimberley landscape after the wet season. Termite mounds are iconic and unique features of the Kimberley. Here the drawing has been made using over 2500 meters of thread and Kimberley ochre.
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